Funktronic Envelope Filter

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I just finished assembling this nifty little effect pedal. What we have here is what started a rehouse job that kind of mutated into it’s own thing. Years ago, I built a clone of an old MXR Envelope Filter from Tonepad. I’d modded it for bass by adding a “Deep” switch that added a couple of larger capacitors to lower the range of the sweep. Additionally, I’d added a couple of other mods recommended by Mark Hammer on DIYStompboxes.com.

Of course as with all bass effects, there was a sort of loss attack and low end which made using the filter onstage in a band situation a little uninspiring. I had decided to add a blend feature which would mix a little of my dry signal with the wet signal. Initially, I’d opted for a B.Blender circuit, but there wasn’t a pre-made PCB available. Looking around at some other options out there, I discovered the Paramix on GuitarPCB.com. The Paramix is a really cool pedal that would allow me not only to blend my dry signal with any effect in the effect loop, but would allow me to blend two separate effects independently of one another. Realizing that the Paramix was indeed a very powerful tool by itself I decided it would be best for me to make a box that would serve both the Paramix and the EF together.

Realizing that this would be a fairly cumbersome set of circuits, I came to the conclusion that I would need a larger enclosure. I found a really nice sloped steel enclosure over at EffectsEnclosures.com. David make these custom enclosures himself and they come in standard sizes. However, he happened to have had this extra large one laying around and he sold it to me at a very reasonable price. I gave it a little design that was my attempt at paying homage to some of the really cool looking old effects pedals of yesteryear such as units produced by Maestro and Mutron.

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The Paramix was a bear of build, mostly due to my ineptitude. Thanks to the guys over at GuitarPCB.com I was able to troubleshoot and get it working. They were a tremendous help. After a really specific round of troubleshooting instructions, I was able to find that one of the pins on the IC socket would not make contact with the circuit board. They advised me to stick a little jumper in there to make the pins make better contact.

In the end, the pedal works and sounds great. I put the two side by side as separate effects, mainly so I could place Envelope Filter anywhere in the effects loop chain. The Paramix does a brilliant job blending the wet and dry signals together and really brings out the low end in my filter. I can pretty much dial in the Isley’s Fight the Power tone instantaneously. Even better, it also unlocks the awesomely funky potential of the otherwise useless reverse sweep mod. Yay!

 

CD Cover

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Last year we made a CD cover for our client, Dawn Drake and Zapote. The image on the cover was illustrated by Dawn, and we took the image and altered the colors to fit the look of the new CD cover. The results were great and the cover looks fantastic.

We set the type in Nexa, a nice, readable font that is easy to read at small point sizes and had many typefaces to choose from.

Cycling Jerseys

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Here’s a pair of cycling jerseys I did for a local bike shop here in Ventura, CA. The idea was to do one retro jersey and one that had more of an event vibe going on. The Great Wave jersey was also intended it be kind of “ladies” version, but a lot of the guys liked that one as we. I picked the Hokusai image to sort of represent the seaside feel of Ventura as well as pay homage to one of my artists in the process. A colleague of mine pointed out the the retro jersey had the same colors as the ’55 Bel Air.

Cycling jerseys designed by Dang! Creative Services in Ventura County

This was a project of which I was really excited to be a part. Being an avid cyclist for pretty much my whole life, it was really great to do a job that was rooted in something that I really love. The best part is that the jerseys were a success! The client sold out of them and ended up buying another design which he has yet to have printed. I’ll update as soon as I get one.

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Evel Knievel Comes to Cooperville: Recently Discovered Photographs Collected in New Book

Evel Knievel Comes to Cooperville: Recently Discovered Photographs Collected in New Book

Done to Death has just published a recently discovered collection of photographs of 70s daredevil, Evel Knievel. For any boy who grew up in the 1970’s, there are few cultural icons who could inspire as much awe as this red, white and blue clad madman. He would jump over rows of flaming cars on his Harley, strap himself to a rocket and shoot himself over the Snake River Canyon, survive horrible crashes, break bones and endure third degree burns only to get up and do it again. What mind of a 10 year old boy wouldn’t be blown out of the stratosphere?

In his review of Evel Knievel Comes to Cooperville, Rob Alderson at itsnicethat.com:

At the height of his fame in 1972, Evel (real name Robert) was invited down to the Oklahoma State Fairground to wow the crowds by local businessman Jack Cooper, the owner of Cooperville Car Dealership. Four decades later Jack’s grandson Garrett Colton found a box of slides in his grandfather’s attic which captured that very special visit with vivid old school charm.

Evel Knievel Comes to Cooperville: Recently Discovered Photographs Collected in New Book   Continue reading

Weldon Metal Works Logo

Weldon Metalworks Logo

As a general policy, we here at Dang Creative Services discourage the use if raster art in logo design. However, in this case, we’ve decided to make an exception to this rule.

In designing the Weldon Metalworks logo for this guy, our client asked for a piece that would resemble a metal badge that you would see welded to steel. Intended as a small plaque that would be applied to his original artwork, we figured it was okay to go nuts in Photoshop with the drop shadows and texture layers. We think the results were great!

Latte Art From Jesus Morales

Jesus Made by Jesus: Latte Art From Jesus Morales

Jesus Morales, a barrista at A.O.C. and Lucques in Los Angeles has been perfecting his mad painterly skills with steamed milk and espresso. Expect to see the face of Jesus in your latte or cats crawling out of your cappuccino. Morales has been experimenting with latte art for the last year and sees every cup as a blank canvas. Who knows? You may even see a miracle.

Click here to view full article at www.laweekly.com

Jesus Made by Jesus: Latte Art From Jesus Morales

Jesus Made by Jesus: Latte Art From Jesus Morales

Jesus Made by Jesus: Latte Art From Jesus Morales